xmakina:

unicorndeathrace:

I dont know who made this but whoever you are, I love you.

The greatest mashup of our generation

teenageguide:

"Like a Prayer," Madonna

At the center of my mantle is a flea-market rendering of the Virgin of Guadalupe. She is the most colorful part of my living space, a burst of near-neon life against stark white walls and more muted art. It’s maybe a little strange. I’m neither Mexican nor a practicing Catholic, but her image and other religious iconography have always drawn me in. That’s why I’ve also always been drawn to Madonna — the ultimate Catholic woman with unsanctioned tendencies.

“Like a Prayer” is the first video that I vividly remember seeing. This was obviously not Church-approved, what with the figure of a black Jesus who comes alive and kisses our heroine in a pew. It’s the justice-for-the-persecuted story line that stuck with me, though, and that’s the kind of lens through which I was already predisposed to interpret the teachings of my birth faith. This kind of interpretation led to me having multiple ideological run-ins with nuns (and maybe when I wore a Tinky-Winky backpack in 8th grade because of insane talk of him being “the gay Teletubby,” I was antagonizing them) and priests (but never Franciscan monks, bless them), run-ins that taught me so much and made me who I am. And I’ve always had Madonna to go back to as an example, as a person with the utmost respect for the imagery and stories and little respect for the dogma and hierarchy.

(And I mean, Leon Robinson. Damn.) —Alicia

god bless alicialapirata for waiting for the day of our Lord’s death to post a video about Madonna fucking him in a church.

i will never understand conservatism in this country. it is such a behemoth movement that it cannot be ignored, and yet it is so intellectually and morally bankrupt that it cannot be taken seriously. the only function it serves is to distract attention from the serious systemic flaws of our country, to keep us bickering about nonsense when we should be focused on solving real problems. at best, it serves to make hacks like jon stewart and aaron sorkin look reasonable, progressive, and constructive by comparison. at worst, it actively strips america’s most vulnerable of their rights and works to destroy our country and our world for the benefit of an elite few. its most loyal proponents are the ones it most harms, and its rhetoric is so backwards that it’s at best completely meaningless (and, at worst, downright dishonest; e.g. “pro-life”, “right-to-work”, “death panels” etc).

i’ve made a serious effort to keep myself open to listen to conservative opinions, because the best way to know you can trust your own beliefs is to keep them challenged. i’ve only been disappointed, though, because conservatism has offered nothing challenging whatsoever. frustrating, sure. but only frustrating in its equal levels of ubiquity and vapidness.

besturlonhere:

did i just blow your mind

just posted this on my moms facebook but i doubt she’ll d o it

besturlonhere:

did i just blow your mind

just posted this on my moms facebook but i doubt she’ll d o it

jhrmn:

today is a dogboarding kind of day

Freddie Gibbs & Madlib ft. BJ the Chicago Kid - Shame

pluralisms:

"save that face for posterity" — joe vaughan

saving this for when someone posts some shitty comment on my facebook

teenageguide:

"Flagpole Sitta," Harvey Danger

In his 33 1/3 book on Armed Forces, Franklin Bruno describes the essence of Elvis Costello’s “Avenging Dork” persona: “The Avenging Dork constantly wants (and fears) sex, but is not sure why; has become embittered by a perceived pattern of personal and professional rejection; craves intimacy but grows suspicious or defensive in its presence; projects his immaturity onto women whom he first idealizes and then degrades, by word or deed; needs external validation but loathes, preemptively, those in position to mete it out.”

I’m pretty sure Harvey Danger front man Sean Nelson has an Elvis Costello album or two in his collection. He looks like he went as the cover of This Year’s Model for Halloween one year and decided never to take the costume off.

Of course there are the obvious visual similarities, but it’s also easy to hear the Avenging Dork sneering down at us from up atop that flagpole. The band drags and jostles their equipment through a sea of moshers, ravers, goths, and other ’90s types (whose opinions they’re totally far too cool to care about, totally), while Nelson slags off body modders, activist types, and DIY zine-ers. No insecurities here, nope, not a one. It’s hard to think of a lyric that better captures the affected and undeserved air of cynicism that’s come to be associated with the decade than those lines about stupids breeding and cretins feeding. Well, except maybe for the self-consciously detached bits about the agony and the irony. We find the Dork’s persecution complex given voice in “Paranoia, paranoia, everybody’s coming to get me”; you know, the part we all sing along with really loud. And while most of Nelson’s issues with the ladies get worked out elsewhere on Where Have All the Merrymakers Gone?, this song’s association with Disturbing Behavior gives us a window into that dynamic of idealization and degradation. After all, who can forget A.J. Buckley bellowing “WHY NOT?!” at Katie Holmes when she says she won’t go out with him? Well, ok, I thought it was James Marsden until I looked it up. So I like The Faculty better, sue me. The image still works.

There we have it, ladies and gentlemen. Harvey Danger: Avenging Dorks for the jaded generation. —Kylie

ghost-of-algren:

the world is such an amazing thing

i just showed this to my girlfriend and i swear to god she puked in her mouth a little

(Source: sordidwitch)

this is a virus right